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Preface

Lawrence Denslow's picture
Submitted by Lawrence Denslow on Tue, 05/27/2014 - 11:37

Preface

This present volume is solely an attempt to provide a clear straightforward presentation of some of the simpler aspects of the Reciprocal System of theory. It is not intended to supply any new developments other than terminology and the identification of the origin of certain fundamental concepts that are often assumed as a result of general familiarity with mathematics and the physical sciences. In that sense, it is an introduction to some of the concepts of scalar motion and their consequences for a theoretical universe of motion. The concepts introduced and the terminology used in this volume may be completely new and different from that familiar to most students of the physical sciences as previously presented on this planet. It is impossible to present new ideas completely in terms of old ideas, and therefore, it has become necessary to invent new ways of expressing the ideas so that they will not be mistaken for the old ideas.

It cannot be claimed that this or any other specific way of describing any aspect of the theoretical development is necessarily the correct way, or that this description is what the original author of the theory, Dewey B. Larson, thought, had been developed as consequences for the postulates for the Reciprocal System of theory. As must be recognized for the development of any set of theoretical ideas, each contributor makes his own interpretations of previously available information and puts his stamp on those and other ideas as he sees them. It is the responsibility of all students of science to gather as much information and as many differences of viewpoint as possible from which to make the most intelligent interpretation possible for himself/herself of the world of which he/she is capable.

Subsequent to initial reading, this volume should be studied in conjunction with the other volumes dealing with the development of the Reciprocal System of theory and the theoretical structure of the physical universe written by Dewey B. Larson: New Light on Space and Time, Case Against the Nuclear Atom, Beyond Newton, The Neglected Facts of Science, Nothing But Motion, Basic Properties of Matter, and The Universe of Motion. These and other titles by Dewey B. Larson, as well as other books and pamphlets are available from International Society of Unified Science. Membership in the society is open to all persons interested in the advancement of scientific knowledge. Membership includes a subscription to the journal of ISUS, RECIPROCITY.

Thanks go to the many members of ISUS who have made comments and suggestions concerning the contents of this volume. In consideration of the numerous controversies which have been spawned by the differing viewpoints of the members of ISUS concerning various details of the development, further comments are solicited from all persons interested in the achievement of the ultimate goal of science, a completely consistent and comprehen­sive theoretical description for this physical universe.

Lawrence E. Denslow
July, 1996